Creating Connections by Contributing to The Hilali Toolkit

In the summer 2018, we invited Inclusive Curriculum Consultants at Kingston University to work as virtual research assistants on The Hilali Toolkit. Their task was to design, apply and evaluate their experiences of creating activities for teachers and students across the globe around cultural heritage. This month, we’re sharing Beatrice Carey and Linda-Marie Nakibuuka’s reflections on contributing to The Hilali Toolkit.

 

Reflections on creating ‘Cultural Connections’

 

Beatrice’s activity is called Identifying the cultural connections different cultures share through the artefact of food (‘Cultural Connections’ for short). In participating in this activity, students are encouraged to identify the cultural connections different cultures share through the artefact of food. Using their own heritage as a base, students will use research, history, and oral recollections to explore the global links hidden in heritage based foods and traditions.

“As I have roots in education and a special interest in equity and inclusion, this project was helpful. It allowed me to recall on my own educational experiences involving culture and actually critically engage with curricula from a fresh and unique perspective. It took some time to narrow down my focus as I had ended up making several starter lessons based on different elements of my own heritage I would love to see taught in the classroom. I aspire to become a professor and this allowed me to apply my K-12 training in a different more open-ended context. After finalizing which lesson to go forth with I began having in depth conversations about food, its message, and origin with friends and family around me.

 

I am very fortunate that I have multiple generations within my family spanning past the Civil Rights Movement and was actually taught how to prepare some of my traditional meals from my great-grandparents who were born in the generation right after the Emancipation Proclamation. This project actually allowed me to connect more to potential cultural roots in Africa, as I found out that a lot of our traditional food was adapted from the memories and cultures of those who came over during slavery from West Africa. Speaking with friends who are Ghanaian, Jamaican, and Haitian to discover that we had connections through food so strong was moving and humbling.

 

Then through further interviews and research discovering that a dish as simple as black-eyed peas reached across Asia made this project worthwhile for me.  I spent quite some time lost in reading and researching different parts of my heritage, which was quite a great delight and I also got to understand more about myself, my family, and community. Although my project was about food, I learned about hair, celebrations, independence days, and national identity formed through common threads. I really enjoyed being a part of this project”

 

Reflections on creating ‘Linguistic Diversity’

 

Linda-Marie’s activity is called Exploring of linguistic diversity using human bingo to facilitate a discussion about language preservation (‘Linguistic Diversity for short). The aim of this activity is to raise students’ awareness about the importance of language preservation and understand the key role language has in culture. In a short space of time, it is designed to help them identify how many languages are spoken by a group and also know what languages other than the dominant languages(s) are spoken. As well as helping to begin a discussion about the importance of language preservation, this activity also facilitates students in getting to know each other. Watch Linda Marie’s reflections:

 

 

 

About the Hilali Toolkit Contributors

 

 

Beatrice Carey is an African American contemporary visual artist and art researcher completing her MFA in Fine Art at Kingston University. Her work centers around equity in society, a desire for a deeper understanding of the cultural aesthetic standards that shape our perceptions of African Americans and their relation to black representation and attainment in education, with particular focus to the arts. She is currently a Senior Curriculum Consultant for Kingston University’s Equality Diversity and Inclusion Centre where she helps implement the Inclusive Curriculum Framework through the Curriculum Consultancy program.

 

 

Linda-Marie Nakibuuka is a curriculum consultant and MSc International Business Management student at Kingston University London. As sitting chairperson of a UK-based youth charity, Ingenium, she brings her experience of equality, diversity and inclusion to the Hilali project. She is currently carrying out research as part of her master’s consultation project on the 4th industrial revolution and how learning will change with the future of work. In addition to this, Linda-Marie has worked extensively in the not-for-profit sector for organisations such as the British Red Cross, the Challenge Network and Envision. As a project engagement worker at the British Red Cross, Linda-Marie was involved in the Inspired Action project which worked to engage more young people in volunteering, particularly those with disabilities. Her involvement gave her a deeper understanding of how essential it is to adopt the social rather than the medical model when looking at disabilities. Her long-term goal is to be in a position where she can influence and apply these ideas in her country of birth, Uganda

 

The Hilali Toolkit continues to grow with other contributions being developed. The activities are being co-created by teachers, students, researchers, academics and others interested in developing tools for those working in Higher Education and Cultural Heritage. To make an activity, the Hilali Toolkit Learning Designer can be used. If you are interested in contributing activities, please use our learning designer or contact us.

From community to classroom: Co-creating activities for the Hilali Living Curriculum

In May 2018, we held a co-design workshop to bring together students, teachers, researchers and policy-makers to explore building a living curriculum for cultural heritage and STEM. Some of the outputs of the workshop are now emerging and the first are two Hilali community contributions for The Hilali Toolkit.

 

The toolkit is based on the premise that cultural heritage, computing science and engineering teaching and learning, together with the sensitisation to qualitative research methods, can lead to engaging learning experiences for students which can have a genuine impact on education for sustainable development.

 

This toolkit has proven to be effective for an Egyptian audience but can also prove beneficial as a locally and culturally relevant educational resource in other Middle East & Arab countries and communities and beyond.

 

We continue to grow our network and the toolkit and invite local, regional and national cultural heritage organisations and policy makers, students, teachers and researchers to participate and re-mix, adapt the open educational resources and technologies made available.

 

The co-created activities and our developing framework to help build a living curriculum for cultural heritage and STEM form part of a new set of institutional resources we are now creating for higher education in the UK and beyond. This will support interdisciplinary learning and teaching with technology where students and communities as partners play a key role in developing curriculum innovation.

 

Check out our new community contributions:

 

Gastronomic heritage: Preserving cultural heritage through the celebration of food

Culture over the Years: Gathering intergenerational interpretations of cultural heritage in a local area

 

Hilali Network research presented at the 2018 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2018)

In April 2018, Danilo Giglitto, Research Associate at the Hilali Network,  presented our  work on merging HCI and ICH at the 2018 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI 2018) at the Palais des congrès de Montréal in Canada. Danilo shared outcomes related to the practice-based research  carried out by  educators and students during the 2017 Hilali Summer School in Egypt.

 

 

CHI is arguably the biggest and most important conference about Human Computer Interaction (HCI). HCI is a field of study focusing on the design of computer technology and, in particular, the interaction between humans (the users) and computers. It encompasses multiple disciplines, such as computer science, cognitive science, and human-factors engineering. While initially concerned with computers, HCI has since expanded to cover almost all forms of information technology design (https://www.interaction-design.org/literature/topics/human-computer-interaction).

This annual session hosted more than 3,000 computer educators, researchers and professionals who participated in ground-breaking talks and discussions about a manifold of topics addressing challenges around the human-factor in technology design. The 2018 theme of the conference, Engage, really captured the essence our work carried out at the Hilali Summer School, in which we worked with students to engage the Bedouins of North-Central Egypt in the design of suitable mobile technology for the self-documentation of intangible cultural heritage (ICH).

 

 

 

The presented paper (downloadable from this link) – which was co-authored by Shaimaa Lazem and Anne Preston – was included in the session “User Innovation in Marginalized Communities”. This session was consistent with two of the core objectives of the Hilali Network: 1) to advance human-computer education in Egypt by empowering local designers and 2) to safeguard Bedouin ICH through digital means. The importance of the first objective stems from evidences showing how an establishment of HCI education in Egyptian university courses could be beneficial for the growth of the Egyptian ICT sector and, as a result, the Egyptian economy overall. The relevance of the ‘safeguarding’ aspects derives from the risk of fading away that the ICH of this community is going through because of big societal changes. To try counteracting this phenomenon, the member of this community showed a willingness to become the users for the design that took place within this project.

 

 

 

The talk explained how the specific configuration of the Hilali Network, which is a partnership between the UK and Egypt, represented also an opportunity to look at something we were interested in from the outset, which is the power dynamics within our attempt to engage the Bedouins in the design of technology and the subsequent documentation of ICH. In fact, the Hilali Summer School was both our way to advance HCI education in Egypt and our case study for our attempt to explore decolonising and postcolonial stances in learning about HCI. While we acted as mentors during the student-led school activities, we used postcolonial and decolonizing investigative lenses to further the theoretical advancement scholarly movements such as postcolonialism in HCI, Arab HCI, and AfriCHI. To this scope, we presented to the audience two main research questions which were anchored to different perspectives, respectively an international and intranational perspective. The international perspective was about how the Egyptian students perceived the power dynamics within our project. The intranational perspective was about what were the main challenges for the students-designers in enacting the participation of a culturally-distant community.

 

The pinnacle of the presentation was represented by our findings showing how more practical and theoretical work is needed to better understand (and, hopefully, overcome) colonising legacies and attitudes in cross-cultural design processes. We explained how from the students’ perspective, the Hilali Summer School had – initially – a colonialist flavour, with Western institutions such as Kingston University and UNESCO misrepresented as having much agency in the design process. However, the findings of the intranational perspective suggest that new power relationships may take place when designers from a developing country lead a design for a culturally-distant community such as the Bedouins.

 

 

 

Given the complexity of the scenario proposed, we closed the presentation with three recommendations. Firstly, to support local HCI communities such as AfriCHI and Arab HCI as these are the ones that allow understanding a cultural context better and, in doing so, making to engage marginalised voices into a design more likely. Secondly, to embrace complexity, especially when looking at themes such as post colonialism in design, and to explore preconceptions at a micro level. Finally, to explore the power dynamics with local teams beforehand as this could allow discovering hidden struggles and perceived lack of agency that need addressing.

 

Engaging a high number of researchers and practitioners in such complex themes is what makes conference such as CHI must-go venues to foster deep reflections and conversations.

Our participation in the conference was made possible by The Newton Fund, part of the UK’s Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitment, whose primary focus is to develop partner countries research and innovation capacity for longterm sustainable growth.

Bringing people and projects together across shared interests in intangible cultural heritage, education and digital technology

Workshop organisers: academics and student ambassadors from Kingston University

In May 2018, we held a workshop at EU House in London to share some of the insights from our work on building a living curriculum for Cultural Hertiage, with a particular focus on intangible cultural heritage and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths ). In putting together the hands-on workshop, we were inspired by Jyoti Hosagrahar’s  (Director of the Division of Creativity at UNESCO) recent comment that  ‘It is no longer a question of whether intangible cultural heritage should be integrated in university programmes, but rather how’. We invited international UK based policy makers, educators, students, practitioners and researchers to participate in this unique workshop as key contributors. The workshop functioned as a call to arms to gather together to co-create engaging lifelong learning experiences for students and educators in higher education in Egypt, the UK, and elsewhere.

 

 

We used a series of design challenges in Digital Technology, Cultural Heritage and Education to introduce participants to the merging of ideas from intangible cultural heritage and STEM and Education. The challenges remixed those used with students as part of the Hilali Summer School in Egypt ran by our Egyptian lead Dr Shaimaa Lazem and UK researcher Dr Danilo Giglitto. These summer school activities are now embedded in The Hilali Toolkit. The challenges had the overall aim to action the building of Living Curricula in these areas – which we started to do at the end of day.

 

 

Design Challenge 1 was focused on digital technology and we initiated thinking about this early on through the use of a cultural probe. For those who don’t know, a cultural probe is a technique that sees the use of material (in this case, an email sent prior to the event) to inspire people’s responses about their thoughts and experiences.  We have used this activity when working with students around technology and cultural heritage topics so we thought it would be good to model this for the workshop. The aim was to facilitate our key contributors’ subsequent experiences in the activities of the workshop. We wanted to everyone to identify and raise their own awareness of the influence of perceptions, cultures, and backgrounds in digital technology. The question sent to everyone was: What in your opinion are the main challenges to the use of technology in supporting cultural heritage projects?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We had some great feedback that Design Challenge 2, which honed in on Cultural Heritage and power dynamics, was particularly enjoyed by all. In this activity, we invited contributors to consider the stakeholders and beneficiaries in our own project, The Hilali Network, and place them in a series of concentric circles reflecting the distribution of power and benefits. There were three teams working together on this and the results were all different and reflected the ideal and realistic nature of cultural heritage community projects.

 

 

Design challenge 3 got into the meat of the workshop to start drafting out living curricula. This is where our more specific Educational lens came into play. We used headers from our Hilali Toolkit and invited teams to complete a narrative for one particular activity for Higher Education and Intangible Cultural Heritage, where digital technology could also play a role. Two quite different activities were drafted one based on intergenerational interpretations of cultural heritage in a local area and the other on Protecting gastronomic heritage.

 

 

 

As well as a speed-dating session which was predictably loud and energetic, there were provocations by Hilali Network associate partners Dr Tania Fonseca, Prof Linda Price and Prof Peter Stone. They helped set the scene for big questions on the role of digital technology and education in developing agendas around cultural heritage activity.  Based on a synthesis of the cultural probe responses by Prof Linda Price, Dr Fonseca presented 8 thematic areas which appeared to inform and grow out of contributors’ responses.

 

 

 

The workshop was designed with the aim of providing a cross-disciplinary space for the co-creation of tools, ideas and projects in Cultural Heritage and STEM. Together with our new contributors, the outcomes of the workshop will be integrated into open educational resources in The Hilali Toolkit, which can be used in Higher Education as well as with communities of adult learners in formal and informal learning contexts internationally.

 

 

 

We would like to especially thank Friends of the workshop, the Teaching Excellence Alliance, who supported dissemination of the event and its preparations.

 

2018 European year of cultural heritage logoThe workshop was officially recognised as part of the UK celebrations by the European Commission  during the European Year of Cultural Heritage #EYCH18 which is promoting the role of Europe’s cultural heritage and its importance to cultural diversity and intercultural dialogue. The year includes events and initiatives across the UK and the rest of Europe to encourage people to explore and debate Europe’s rich and diverse cultural heritage (tangible, intangible, natural, digital and all types of cultural activities).

 

The workshop was supported as part of the Newton Fund, part of the UK’s Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitment, whose primary focus is to develop partner countries research and innovation capacity for longterm sustainable growth.

 

 

Your Invitation to Building a Living Curriculum for Cultural Heritage and STEM

Nubian kids descend their home stairs at West Aswan
Copyright Seif Eldin Samer (Hilali Student Network)

 

It is no longer a question of whether intangible cultural heritage should be integrated in university programmes, but rather how

Jyoti Hosagrahar, December 2017, Director of the Division of Creativity at UNESCO.

 

As communities across the world become increasingly concerned about safeguarding and protecting their heritage, local educational systems, and the people who teach and learn in them, can adapt their existing curricula and create new experiences to address this challenge. 

The Hilali Network invites you to participate in a unique workshop which is building a platform for policy makers, educators, students, practitioners and researchers with a vested interest in the future of Cultural Heritage and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) education. This is a call to arms to gather together with other thought leaders to co-create engaging lifelong learning experiences which can have a genuine impact on education for sustainable development.

This workshop will introduce participants through practice-based research approaches to the merging of ideas from intangible cultural heritage and STEM and Education to for the building of Living Curricula in these areas. 

A Living Curriculum repositions “learning as a continuous conversation within a dynamic curriculum that is integrated with, and takes advice from, the world our students live in” (Marshall & Scott, 2012).

“Intangible Cultural Heritage means the practices, representations, expressions, knowledge, skills – as well as the instruments, objects, artifacts and cultural spaces associated therewith – […], transmitted from generation to generation, is constantly recreated by communities and groups in response to their environment, their interaction with nature and their history, and provides them with a sense of identity and continuity, thus promoting respect for cultural diversity and human creativity.” (UNESCO, 2003 Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage)

The workshop is designed with the aim of providing a cross-disciplinary space for the co-creation of tools, ideas and projects in Cultural Heritage and STEM.  The outcomes of the workshop will be integrated into open educational resources in The Hilali Toolkit, which can be used in Higher Education as well as with communities of adult learners in formal and informal learning contexts internationally.

Throughout the day, there will be a series of provocations of the areas of intangible cultural heritage, STEM and Education from key contributors in these fields to keep the creative thinking going. 

 

When: Friday 4th May 2018

 

Where: Representation of the European Commission in the UK, Europe House, 32 Smith Square, London SW1P 3EU. 

 

Participate by Signing up via our Event Site 

 

2018 European year of cultural heritage logo

 

 

The Hilali Network celebrates cross-cultural understanding with the 2018 European Year of Cultural Heritage!

2018 marks the European Year of Cultural Heritage #EYCH18 and The Hilali Network is participating in the celebrations as part of the United Kingdom showcase. The year includes events and initiatives across the UK and the rest of Europe to encourage people to explore and debate Europe’s rich and diverse cultural heritage (tangible, intangible, natural, digital and all types of cultural activities).

 

The UK national co-ordinator, performed by North of England Civic Trust is encouraging the UK community to get involved in the European Year of Cultural Heritage and is providing a space for citizens to collaborate, be informed about every EYCH event in the United Kingdom and promote cultural diversity.

 

At our up and coming workshop planned for 4th May 2018 at EU House (to be advertised soon), participants will be invited to work together to co-create cultural heritage educational activities through digital technology research approaches and STEM education.  Our event has been added as part of a programme recognised by the European Commission which promotes the role of Europe’s cultural heritage and its importance to cultural diversity and intercultural dialogue.

 

The activities of The Hilali Network both in the UK and Egypt aim to support cross-cultural understandings of cultural heritage in Europe and beyond as well as the celebration of cultural differences. The Hilali Network leads are from across the globe, including Italy, Portugal, Egypt and the UK & Northern Ireland – which makes for a diverse team of people with many of their own cultural heritage stories to tell each other!

 

If you would like to know more about the up and coming workshop, contact us at hilali.network@gmail.com

 

Learn more about the European Year of Cultural Heritage campaign and subscribe to the EYCH 2018 newsletter to receive regular updates about the campaign and available materials.

 

You can also follow social media channels: Facebook and Twitter and join the conversation with #EuropeForCulture

 

Insights into flexible learning and the possibilities for a 21st century Higher Education in Cultural Heritage

 In November 2017, Hilali partner Dr Sam Elkington, Academic Lead for Assessment Feedback & Flexible Learning at the Higher Education Academy, UK, was a keynote speaker at an event on technology and cultural heritage which took place at our Institutional Link, the City for Scientific Research and Technological Applications – Alexandria, Egypt.

 

Dr Elkington’s talk focused on how the fields of engineering and computer science have a dominant role to play in sustainable development and therefore, hold a position of considerable social responsibility and wide-ranging educational possibility for embracing different ways of thinking and working in a 21st century higher education.

 

 

With participants, he explored how flexible provision based on the HEA’s Flexible Learning Framework, has the potential to enhance student learning, widen opportunities for participation in Higher Education and develop graduates who are well-equipped to contribute to a fast-changing world.

 

“It is these concerns and interests that currently dominant in driving the Higher Education Academy’s work in flexible learning and flexible pedagogy”, he shared, “ we have been drawing on substantial and wide-ranging practice-based research and development into flexibility, across disciplines and levels of university operation on the fields of engineering and computer science”.

 

Dr Elkington’s talk also distilled the notable conditions under which greater flexibility can be achieved securely, so as to maintain the integrity and good standing of universities, and wider higher education system; and pointed to ways in which universities might be afforded even more responsiveness and to identify conditions that are likely to promote such greater flexibility.  “The first is about the conditions for securing a sound platform for flexibility; the second is about the conditions and steps that might be taken that will inject momentum towards flexibility” he explained.

 

“There was some really interesting discussion particularly with the student participants who really wanted to challenge me on ways they could better prepare themselves for flexibility in the world of work” Dr Elkington reported of the event. “In my closing remarks I posed 3 questions regarding the idea of ‘readiness’ for flexibility at the level of the student, the tutor and the institution, my take home lesson from the whole experience will be the response of one of the female students to the question of student readiness for flexibility, she came up to me and said very confidently: “we are ready for more flexibility, but THEY are not, I thought that this was a wonderful statement, and even a possible title for a future publication for the Hilali Project”

 

Dr Elkington advises into planning for student-community partnerships and mapping out educational principles underling the Hilali Network’s work including the up and coming Hilali Toolkit Beta version, launched in Feburary 2018.

 

Our recent Hilali Summer School in August 2017, based around working with working with the Bedouin community in Egypt, was very much informed by his ongoing work around how we develop pedagogies of flexible learning with the integration of technology enhanced learning.

 

In February 2018, , Hilali Principal Investigator, Dr Anne Preston and Dr Elkington will share practical insights from the Flexible Learning Framework and the Hilali Nework at the HEA’s Annual STEM Conference.  Focusing this year on Creativity in Teaching, Learning and Student Engagement, they will run a workshop entitled ‘How to build a living curriculum for STEAM: Technology meets cultural heritage’.

 

The Hilali partners’ participation in Egypt was funded by The Newton Fund, part of the UK’s Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitment, whose primary focus is to develop partner countries research and innovation capacity for longterm sustainable growth.

 

The HEA is the leading UK sector body committed to developing world-class teaching in higher education, working in partnership with HE providers and professionals in supporting and securing student success.

 

 

Ghosts from the past: The value of tangible and intangible cultural heritage to the present and future

In November 2017, Hilali partner Prof Peter Stone OBE, was a keynote speaker at an event on technology and cultural heritage which took place at our Institutional Link, the City for Scientific Research and Technological Applications – Alexandria, Egypt.

 

Prof Stone’s talk focused on the value of tangible and intangible cultural heritage to the present and future. He explored ideas around our links to -memories of- the past and how these memories are frequently not our own direct memories but rather those of our family or community; through which we are linked to a past longer than own personal lives.

 

“Some links are even longer” he shared “unlocked only by a study of the past through history or archaeology. Many such memories are frequently related to tangible and intangible cultural heritage. They situate us not only within family and community but provide the context of our contemporary lives and how we relate to each other. Just as our own memories are both positive and negative, important or irrelevant, so such community memories are both positive and negative. Our memories may at times clash with, or contradict, memories of the same events held by others. How we as individuals and communities interact with and use these memories has a potentially massive impact on how our community functions. ‘Bad’ memories can have a negative impact on how an individual -and a community- functions and what they aspire to achieve”

 

A key question he posed was this:  Do we learn from these memories, our version of the past,  and how do we deal with some of the negative memories, perhaps as a burden that needs to be addressed, atoned for, in the present?

One observation he offered is that it is impossible to ignore the past; how we interact with it establishes how we live in the present and begin to shape the future.

 

As part of the event Prof Stone attended a workshop that included a discussion on the future of the Hilali project. He stressed that any developments need to take into account four key questions: Who is interested in the project – and why? Who owns the data under discussion? Who controls that data? Who will benefit from a developed, extended project? These are very pertinent questions the Hilali Network will be critically engaging with in its next phases.

 

Prof Stone advises on the development of collaborative and multi-organisational approaches to working with and across local communities in cultural heritage education in the Hillai Network. Our recent Hilali Summer School, based around working with working with the Bedouin community in Egypt, was very much informed by his ongoing work around participatory approaches to working with communities.

 

Next month, we’ll hear more from Dr Sam Elkington’s experiences of sharing ideas on flexible learning in Egypt.

 

The Hilali partners’ participation in Egypt was funded by The Newton Fund, part of the UK’s Official Development Assistance (ODA) commitment, whose primary focus is to develop partner countries research and innovation capacity for longterm sustainable growth.

Two Weeks in Pyramid: Student Views on the Hilali Summer School

Hilali Summer School -Class of 2017

Greetings everyone! It’s high time for an update! In August-September 2017, the Hilali Network’s activities kicked off in earnest, we held a two week summer school which focused on student and community-led co-design of technologies for the documentation of Intangible Cultural Heritage. The summer school was hosted by City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Egypt (SRTA-City) and jointly delivered by Shaimaa Lazem from SRTA-City, Danilo Giglitto from Kingston University (UK) as well as a team of junior researchers. The design of the school was informed by a number of innovative curriculum design approaches including a Living Curriculum approach and the Higher Education Academy’s Flexible Learning Framework. However, what was central to the summer school overall was the localisation of these approaches to the Egyptian context, and even more than this, the students themselves.

 

So, in keeping with the philosophy of the network, we leave this month’s update and a first review of the summer school design to our talented student members who kept a blog during the activities: Two Weeks in a Pyramid 

 

Next on the horizon is a unique event hosted in Alexandria, Egypt in November 2017 which will bring together stakeholders from across Egypt and the UK. The hot topic on the agenda will be the sustainability of teaching and research models to the design of technologies for documenting intangible cultural heritage. The event will see Hilali Network partners Professor Peter Stone from Newcastle University and Dr Sam Elkington from the Higher Education Academy share sights on the present and future of cultural heritage and higher education – in a  cultural heritage and higher education twist!

 

For everything else Hilali, more posts, photos and interactions can be found on Twitter https://twitter.com/hilali_network and now on our student-led Facebook

Building a Living Co-curriculum through Technology Design for Intangible Culture Heritage

July has been a busy time for the Hilali Network and opportunity for our partners to come together face to face to explore creative approaches to our first major joint activity: the Hilali Summer School.  This month, Dr Shaimaa Lazem, lead of the Hilali Network in Egypt reports on her eclectic stay in the UK. The purpose of the trip was to design activities for the Hilali Summer School. The outcomes of this Summer School will form the basis of a student-centred Living Co-Curriculum for Intangible Cultural Heritage and Human Computer Interaction:

 

The first part of my trip was to associate partner Open Lab in Newcastle (UK) to bounce ideas with Culture Heritage expert (Prof Peter Stone), Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) researchers from Open Lab at Newcastle University and Northumbria University (Professor John Vines and Dr Rachel Clarke). We focused on ways by which participatory approaches in technology design could be put to use with students and community members. Next on the agenda was working with Higher Education specialists Dr Anne Preston (UK lead Hilali Network), Prof Linda Price, and Dr Sam Elkington (Higher Education Academy) to explore life-wide learning, flexible learning, and problem-based learning as potential educational frameworks for the curriculum – this curriculum is something which the project will develop of the next few months and make available to everyone interested in merging design in Intangible Cultural Heritage, Human Computer Interaction teaching with re-design in higher education. It is also something we hope other sectors will be interested in remixing. The curriculum will be embedded in the Culture Logger Toolkit, which will form the basis of our work from October.

 

I spent three weeks at Kingston University in London where I worked with Dr Danilo Giglitto, research associate for the Hilali Network. We worked intensively to integrate my expertise in teaching Human Computer Interaction and my knowledge about the Egyptian computing science context, with his domain expertise in intangible cultural heritage – along with the plethora of ideas we had in the first two stages of this trip whilst at Open Lab. The outcome is a problem-based, hands-on curriculum and a student-centered pedagogical approach to explore the use of technology in bottom-up Intangible Cultural Heritage documentation.

 

During the trip, we also received 53 applications from amazing undergraduate engineering students to join our Hilali Summer School, from which Dr Giglitto and I selected 19 students.

 

The Hilai Summer School kicks off on 21st August and runs across two weeks.